*new* “Spasm Chasm” by Thermometerometer.

6 01 2017

A nihilistic twitch, an abyssal dance, a Spasm Chasm. Thermometerometer’s latest batch of improvised electronic swirls has the power to mesmerize, seize, absorb, and unravel. The chasm opens, the sounds spill out, the chasm shuts, the sounds skitter over the wound.

Thermometerometer is:

Dan (Speak Onion) Abatemarco- nord modular synth, contact mics, effect pedals

David B. Applegate- machinedrum, microGranny, Trogotronic 669, microphone, effect pedals

Get spastic in the ditch, friends.

Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)





THE ENTERTAINMENT: Neurobit

18 02 2016

Amid the chaos that is THE ENTERTAINMENT, Neurobit’s “Completely Puzzled” offers a respite in the form of a propulsive, twinkling gem of a track. Immersive without being ponderous, “Completely Puzzled” refreshes and excites.

Below, see Neurobit’s answers to our questions about the track, music-making, and his approach to sound.

1) Tell us a bit about your contribution to The Entertainment. Is it typical of your music? Are there any sounds/processes/elements in it that you haven’t included before? Were you trying to go for any specific listener reaction?

Neurobit is one of my music projects and the main focus of this project is improvised music generated by video game consoles. So a lot of my tracks have an 8 bit feel to them which makes the sound very recognisable. For me Neurobit tracks feel like landscapes. And that’s what I also had in mind while recording my track for this compilation.

2) Are you better off in your music than you are walking around in life?
That’s a good question haha. I think, since making music is a full time job now, I think I’m probably good at both. But I feel one goes with the other. My music is a reflection of how I feel and my response to the world around me. But what I record also reflects back on who I am and how I feel. The type of sound I respond to and how I treat that sound usually reflects my mood or what I’m feeling at that specific moment.
3) What is noise? What role does “noise” have in your work?
Noise for me is like bringing sound to it’s radical conclusion. There is something pure about it. It can create a lot of energy into a track and noise can makes a track much more intense even when done subtle. In Neurobit tracks I use noise a lot in the form of resonance to go along with melodic long tones to get bit of a feeling like a storm is rushing by. I used that a lot when I released “Maison De Verre Sur Le Chantier” in 2012. Over the years I lost a bit of interest in using noise just as it is. Nowadays I’m much more focussed on the combination of noise elements with melodic sounds when recording Neurobit tracks.
4) Did you intentionally want to make something the listener could only speculate about, rather than be certain of?

Let me put it this way. I always put a thought, idea or feeling behind my tracks. I’m not a very big proponent of creating something and letting the public decide what it is. It’s the same type of discussion that you have within abstract visual art. I always want to know what the idea of the artist was. If anyone can decide what it is they’re seeing than it becomes irrelevant to me in a way. I like it when artists have specific ideas behind their work. That doesn’t mean that the listener needs to be certain of everything, but it is important to me to be able to point them into the right
direction.

5) What’s next for Neurobit? Anything you want to tell people about?

There’s is very exciting news for my Neurobit project. I will be releasing a new 12inch very soon.
The test pressings are already done. It will be released by the Dutch label Vrijstaete. http://vrystaete.nl/muziek.html

Last month I also released a new digital Neurobit EP on the Spanish label Lowtoy which can be downloaded for free:
http://www.lowtoy.com/portfolio/neurobit-retro-spectrum-analyzer/

My other projects Former Descent and Rioteer are still going strong as well. As Former Descent I will release a collab album on vinyl later this year. And as Rioteer new breakcore tracks as well as a hardcore ep are ready to be released this year.

Thanks, Neurobit! We look forward to checking out all the sounds you have in store for us. Keep on doing the thing.

-Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)





*new* “Redundant Tautologies” by BLAERG.

16 02 2016

Immigrant Breast Nest invites you to experience “Redundant Tautologies” by BLAERG. Unnatural, mysterious, riveting. Formulates a new chemical to re-arrange your synapses. Especially suited for our audience of heroes.

A 0:00 – Anti-egress
B 0:21 – Parallel Colors
C 1:45 – Cryptogram
D 2:57 – Neurasthenia
E 4:23 – Pseudoparticles
F 5:28 – Chandelerium I
G 6:01 – Psychometrics: Nominal
H 7:01 – Perpendicular Colors
I 8:13 – Etaoin! Shrdlu!
J 8:46 – Specious Methods
K 11:10 – Chandelerium II
L 12:00 – Sex Atrium
M 12:22 – X-height
N 13:00 – Neuronal-social Synchrony
O 14:33 – Effortless Zeal
P 15:11 – Oblique Colors

Redundant Tautologies is a document of experimentation with the Tidal live coding environment. The single cohesive piece on display is arranged into “zones.” These are the Zones of Redundant Tautology.

Sample material includes pieces of previously released and future BLÆRG tracks, as well as yet unused works. Material from Tidal’s native sampler and raw modular synth recordings have also been incorporated.

While not an exercise in “pure” live coding, much here represents that approach. Some zones have been augmented with outside sounds, others used as the backbone for rigorously sequenced segments using additional software.

BLÆRG directs the highest order of appreciation toward Kindohm for the 1-on-1 tutorials and bottomless well of support, and also to Alex McLean for crafting and continually refining the Tidal live coding environment.

Artwork: Xochitl Garcia aka NOMONYM BOT
www.facebook.com/AnalogIsNotDeaddd
toplap.org/tidal/
tidal.lurk.org

 

GET ON IT.

Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)





*new* David B. Applegate E.P. “OFFICE of the LOINS and REINS” + I.B.N. comes to Twitter

12 01 2016

Hello Immigrant Breast Nest family,

We have two announcements today.

1. I.B.N. mainstay David B. Applegate has a new E.P. available for you:

“OFFICE of the LOINS and REINS” eructs a thick pap designed to promote healing, reduce swelling, and relieve pain.

Without proper genre or style, the four tracks presented nonetheless comprise a hubbleshow in its most formal sense. And so,

Hub-a-dub, punkateero!

2. You can now connect with Immigrant Breast Nest on Twitter. In addition to news about I.B.N. releases and events, you can expect a robust colloquy on topics of interest to the experimental electronic music community.

Bounce and jounce, melt the link:

https://twitter.com/derek_tibs
@derek_tibs

See you around,

Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)





Video By bruzed for Speak Onion’s “Ovoid Chamber”

5 11 2015

The Ovoid Chamber is a place where all is visible and audible; all is known. No edges, no shadows, no breaks between fields. One experiences the totality of the chamber at once and constantly. The only possible organization is post-hoc and externally applied. Bruzed and Speak Onion’s Ovoid Chamber is not a manifest experience of the chamber, but rather a reminder that the chamber exists created using manic pixels, cut-up drums, distorted bass, and manipulated field recordings.

From IBN054, “Ovoid Chamber” by Speak Onion.

Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)

 





Speak Onion – “Ovoid Chamber”

5 11 2015

 

Aggressive and elegant, the two tracks on Speak Onion’s latest, “Ovoid Chamber,” reach out with a living vein to take a swipe at convention. In Speak Onion’s hands, drum ‘n noise reveals itself as a sleepless genre undergoing a process of hyper-creative evolution. Embryos twitch, split, and attack. The chamber cracks birthing the most monstrous pieces of brutal electronics in recent memory.

 

Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)





Decrepit Jaw – “World Witness”

5 11 2015

A unique confluence of evolved social consciousness and atavistic sound, Decrepit Jaw’s “World Witness” churns and grinds through fifteen tracks of perception-altering noise corruption. The base materialism of the sound-world shivers and breaks, a clarity of thought and purpose prevails.

Cassette available includes download.

***

All proceeds from this album will be donated to the NATIONAL POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY PROJECT: “coordinated legal action, public education, and support for grassroots and victims’ organizations combating police misconduct.” www.nlg-npap.org

 

Derek Tibs (CEO Immigrant Breast Nest)





Immigrant Breast Nest Presents Show in Brooklyn, October 17!

15 10 2015

IBN_1017

Immigrant Breast Nest presents. . .

FREE SHOW!!

Immigrant Breast Nest is throwing our biggest party of the year. We are celebrating a new cassette release from Decrepit Jaw, “World Witness,” and shooting a video for a forthcoming Speak Onion track featuring MC M.C. Bio aka Bill Pulaski (aka Will Smith of Buckshot Facelift and Artificial Brain). Show up early for the video shoot if you are truly down to party. There will be some drinks provided to everyone who shows up early to mosh on camera. After the shoot, we have a diverse array of live electronic music performances in true I.B.N. style, plus M1N0M0X DJing for true noise dance party vibes. Everything is loud, let your ears hear it.

Decrepit Jaw (new tape release)
[noise, tape manipulations]
Immigrant Breast Nest
http://immigrantbreastnest.com/track/parade-of-dust

enn{kdog
[noise, situationalism]
Immigrant Breast Nest
http://immigrantbreastnest.com/track/rhombusfest-2017

Speak Onion (video shoot)
[drum’n’noise, breakcore]
Immigrant Breast Nest, Ohm Resistance
http://immigrantbreastnest.com/album/in-your-masters-house

XGLARE
[experimental techno, soundscapes]
Blueberry Records/AY
https://soundcloud.com/xglare

ARIADNE
[sacred music, dark ambient]
Auris Apothecary
https://ariadne-music.bandcamp.com/album/tsalal

M1N0M0X
[techno, noise]
Our DJ for the night
https://soundcloud.com/m1n0m0x

Visuals by bruzed
http://www.bruzed.com/

Saturday, October 17, 2015
9PM
(come early at 8PM for a new Speak Onion video shoot)

Bootleg Mansion
387 Sumpter Street, Brooklyn, NY
FREE

 





David Morneau – “Killer Cops”

22 06 2015


 

Immigrant Breast Nest proudly presents David Morneau’sKiller Cops.” Soundtrack to a cri de cœur, this E.P. addresses a dystopian impulse which has leaked into the present. As an aesthetic response to Body Count’s “Cop Killer,” it succeeds. As a piece of innovative electronic music for right now, it excels. Read about the artist’s intention in his own words below:

Black men are being killed by white police officers with sickening frequency. Despite the claims of certain conservative media figures and police apologists, these killings are racial. To take but one example, within weeks of learning that John Crawford was shot for walking around a Wal-Mart with a toy gun (and not pointing it at anyone) we hear the story of a drunk white man in Kalamazoo who carrying a gun in the street. Instead of drawing and firing, a dozen police officers patiently talked this man into putting down his weapon.

This music is about the white cops who react first, taking a life, and too often get away with it. It’s about the anger and frustration I feel when hearing these stories. These stories are not isolated incidents and it’s frustrating that the reaction is not universal outrage. The police are supposed to protect us. Instead they’re perpetrating violence on a segment of our population, creating an atmosphere of fear and anger. I don’t know what else to do or what else to say, so I made this music.

-David Morneau, 6/16/15

Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)





THE ENTERTAINMENT: David Morneau

2 06 2015

Elegance and distortion collide in David Morneau‘s Five Step. A mystery narrator, a garbled message, an insistent beat propelling Five Step into an as-yet-unexplored zone.

Below, see David Morneau’s answers to our questions about the track, music-making, and his approach to sound. Don’t sleep, all the contributors to THE ENTERTAINMENT will be featured here in the coming weeks.

1) Tell us a bit about your contribution to The Entertainment. Is it typical of your music? Are there any sounds/processes/elements in it that you haven’t included before? Were you trying to go for any specific listener reaction?

I like to think that it’s hard to define what’s typical of my music. I think that everything I create is closely related way down in the depths of pieces. The surface elements can vary quite radically. My background is that of a composer trained at universities. I hesitate to call myself a classical composer, but that’s a label that is a convenient reference in this context. My interests in what I listen to are broader than “contemporary classical” music. My composing reflects these broad interests. I hear this kind of sentiment from other composers too. We grew up listening to so much music that isn’t from the traditions that we study, and we’re looking for ways to include all of these sounds in what we do.

I try to approach everything I make, no matter what style or genre or category, with the same openness. It’s always about trying to express something musical. This carries into how I present my music. I don’t segregate my work. I don’t release here under an assumed name. Everything I do comes fro the same nebulous place in my psyche. That’s where whatever patterns that are typical for me emerge.

2) Are you better off in your music than you are walking around in life?
The music is always in my head. I tend to live in my head. I’m definitely better off in my music, but I’m getting better at the whole life thing too.
3) What is noise? What role does “noise” have in your work?
This is such an interesting question. I think that most people have a very specific idea of what noise is (speaking generally rather than of any genre label). And I think it’s safe to say that generally noise is viewed as a bad or unpleasant thing. Against this generalized preconception there is a substantial group of people making and listening to music that includes deliberately noisy elements. My own suspicion is that the attraction to noise is a little like the attraction to hot sauce. It can be abrasive and painful and exhilarating all at once. On repeated listening and exposure, the effect is diminished and the more subtle qualities of the noise become more evident. When one can begin to appreciate the subtlety of noise elements in their music, one can begin to see that noise is like any other element. In some cases noisy sounds can provide a sharp edge to a sound. In others, it can create a nostalgic blur. Henry Cowell writes about noise in a way that I find interesting and instructive. In breaking music down into its basic elements (melody, harmony and rhythm) he suggests that a further distinction is first needed: tone and noise. Tone is sound produced with a periodic vibration and noise is non-periodic vibration. He further suggests that pure tone is largely non existent outside of electrically generated waveforms. A singer creates an almost pure tone when singing a vowel sound, the consonants are irregular, and thus noise. Sonic analysis shows that every musical instrument creates sounds that are a mix of periodic and non-periodic sounds (tone and noise at once). “As a musical sound grows louder, the noise in it is accentuated and the tone element reduced…. Under the best circumstances, the emotions are aroused by musical noise and lulled by musical tone.”When I approach noise in my own work, its use and role is determined by the needs of the piece I’m working on. Very often in music I create for I.B.N., I’m inclined to make it more noisy. This is because there’s a cultural expectation of noisy,”wrecked” sounds here. That difference, for me, doesn’t make the music inherently any better or worse. We can’t have music without noise. How much noise is a matter of preference.
4) Did you intentionally want to make something the listener could only speculate about, rather than be certain of?

I believe that music can only ever be speculative. There’s a common trope in our culture that music is an emotional expression, but I don’t really buy that. Music can evoke an emotional response in a listener. So much of that response depends on the context of the listener (where they hear the music, and also their own history of listening to music). Something that I have a “happy” emotional reaction to may be because it sounds like music that I remember from my childhood. The same piece may very well leave you indifferent because you don’t share that association.Because of our shared cultural heritage, there are general kinds of musical sounds and gestures that can evoke general kinds of emotional responses in many of us. This is why we repeatedly hear the same kinds of music underscoring emotional moments in film and television and advertising and news montage. I don’t think that this fact makes the music itself emotionally certain. Knowing, as I do firsthand, these kinds of musical moments can be crafted out of calculation rather than honest emotional experience, bolsters my confidence in asserting that music does not communicate emotion.Beyond emotion, there’s not much else that could be considered part of a musical communication. Music ideas, such as form and patterns, can certainly be communicated, but they don’t really mean anything outside of music. We have rich and subtle language, capable of all kinds of ideas. If that’s what I were interested in doing, then I would be a writer.

So, I guess what I’m trying to say is that I don’t think my own intention really enters into it. I make music that I enjoy and hope that others enjoy it in whatever fashion that they choose. To me, all music (and art) is speculative.

5) What’s next for David Morneau? Anything you want to tell people about?

More music. Always more. My new EP, Killer Copz, drops this month on I.B.N. I’m setting up a two Gameboy rig right now for twice the lo-fi fun. This will be my main beat maker for a while. I’ll develop new material for shows and future releases. And I’m working on a project with New Thread Quartet for four saxophones and electronic playback inspired by Thoreau’s Walden. The playback will include field recordings from Walden Pond and readings of text sampled from the book. There will be more stuff too, probably.

Thanks, David Morneau! We look forward to dropping Killer Copz (stay tuned, I.B.N. faithful), your upcoming Gameboy explorations, saxophone madness, and all of the other “exclusive unprecedented experiments” we know you have in store.

-Derek Tibs (CEO, Immigrant Breast Nest)